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Factors Contributing to Low Adequate Prenatal Care Rates in Orange County, Florida

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
In 2017, only 56% of births in Orange County, Florida, received adequate prenatal care(-)care that has been shown to prevent maternal and infant death. The Florida Department of Health uses the Kotelchuck Index to determine care adequacy. This index rates care adequacy based on when the mother first receives care, and how many recommended appointments she attends. Prenatal care is rated (")inadequate(") if it starts after the fourth month of pregnancy, and/or if less than half of the recommended appointments are attended. Receiving earlier and consistent prenatal care has been shown to be an effective way to improve birth outcomes.In Florida, counties that have low adequate prenatal care rates like Orange County's tend to be less populous and rural. However, Orange County stands out with its large population of 1.3 million and more urban environment; other Florida counties similar in population and environment to Orange tend to have rates like that of the state's, at approximately 70%.The objective of this study is to determine which factors contribute most significantly to prenatal care inadequacy in Orange, Duval, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, and Pinellas counties; determine the differences between the most significant factors in Orange County and those in the other four counties; and to determine if residing in Orange County in of itself a risk factor for inadequate prenatal care, using logistic regression. By identifying factors that may lead to low adequacy rates, interventions intended to increase care adequacy in Orange County can be better targeted towards populations in need.
Title: Factors Contributing to Low Adequate Prenatal Care Rates in Orange County, Florida.
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Name(s): Daniel, Lauren, Author
Donley, Amy, Committee Chair
Hinojosa, Melanie, Committee CoChair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In 2017, only 56% of births in Orange County, Florida, received adequate prenatal care(-)care that has been shown to prevent maternal and infant death. The Florida Department of Health uses the Kotelchuck Index to determine care adequacy. This index rates care adequacy based on when the mother first receives care, and how many recommended appointments she attends. Prenatal care is rated (")inadequate(") if it starts after the fourth month of pregnancy, and/or if less than half of the recommended appointments are attended. Receiving earlier and consistent prenatal care has been shown to be an effective way to improve birth outcomes.In Florida, counties that have low adequate prenatal care rates like Orange County's tend to be less populous and rural. However, Orange County stands out with its large population of 1.3 million and more urban environment; other Florida counties similar in population and environment to Orange tend to have rates like that of the state's, at approximately 70%.The objective of this study is to determine which factors contribute most significantly to prenatal care inadequacy in Orange, Duval, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, and Pinellas counties; determine the differences between the most significant factors in Orange County and those in the other four counties; and to determine if residing in Orange County in of itself a risk factor for inadequate prenatal care, using logistic regression. By identifying factors that may lead to low adequacy rates, interventions intended to increase care adequacy in Orange County can be better targeted towards populations in need.
Identifier: CFE0007447 (IID), ucf:52715 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): adequate prenatal care -- orange county -- florida -- binary logistic regression -- rural -- urban -- kotelchuck index -- prenatal care -- andersen's behavioral model of health services use
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007447
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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