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Stepping Outside of Yourself: Social Anxiety, Dissociation, Alcohol Consequences, and Relationship Satisfaction

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
OVERVIEW: Social anxiety disorder is the third most prevalent psychiatric disorder in the United States. Dissociation can arise during acute daily social stressors in individuals with social anxiety. This study examined the relationship between social anxiety and functional outcomes (i.e., alcohol-related consequences and relationship satisfaction) as moderated by levels of dissociation (i.e., depersonalization/derealization). It was hypothesized that dissociation would moderate the relationships between social anxiety and alcohol-related consequences and between social anxiety and relationship satisfaction. METHOD: College students who endorsed alcohol use within the past 30 days (n = 320) and college students who reported having been in a romantic relationship lasting 30 or more days (n = 364) were recruited through the Psychology Department's Sona system. All participants completed measures of social anxiety, dissociation, alcohol use motives, alcohol-related consequences, and relationship satisfaction as part of an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Findings indicated no moderation effect in either model; both social anxiety and dissociation predicted alcohol-related consequences via coping-motivated alcohol use. Additionally, there was a negative association between dissociation and relationship satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Future research should include longitudinal research designs or ecological momentary assessment designs and should examine these relationships in clinical samples.
Title: Stepping Outside of Yourself: Social Anxiety, Dissociation, Alcohol Consequences, and Relationship Satisfaction.
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Name(s): Cook, Matthew, Author
Newins, Amie, Committee Chair
Beidel, Deborah, Committee Member
Dvorak, Robert, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: OVERVIEW: Social anxiety disorder is the third most prevalent psychiatric disorder in the United States. Dissociation can arise during acute daily social stressors in individuals with social anxiety. This study examined the relationship between social anxiety and functional outcomes (i.e., alcohol-related consequences and relationship satisfaction) as moderated by levels of dissociation (i.e., depersonalization/derealization). It was hypothesized that dissociation would moderate the relationships between social anxiety and alcohol-related consequences and between social anxiety and relationship satisfaction. METHOD: College students who endorsed alcohol use within the past 30 days (n = 320) and college students who reported having been in a romantic relationship lasting 30 or more days (n = 364) were recruited through the Psychology Department's Sona system. All participants completed measures of social anxiety, dissociation, alcohol use motives, alcohol-related consequences, and relationship satisfaction as part of an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Findings indicated no moderation effect in either model; both social anxiety and dissociation predicted alcohol-related consequences via coping-motivated alcohol use. Additionally, there was a negative association between dissociation and relationship satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Future research should include longitudinal research designs or ecological momentary assessment designs and should examine these relationships in clinical samples.
Identifier: CFE0007445 (IID), ucf:52725 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-05-01
M.S.
Sciences, Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): social anxiety -- alcohol use -- coping -- relationship satisfaction -- emotion regulation -- dissociation -- depersonalization -- derealization
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007445
Restrictions on Access: campus 2020-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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