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Brief Behavioral Health Intervention Program for Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Healthy eating, physical activity, stress management, and smoking cessation are widely recognized as essential for preventing and treating coronary artery disease (CAD). Research on lifestyle programs for patients with CAD has largely focused on long-term interventions (e.g., several months to one-year in duration). Further, many studies have recruited patients immediately post-cardiac event. By contrast, evaluation of brief lifestyle interventions for stable patients treated in outpatient cardiology is lacking. The present study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a 3-session behavioral health lifestyle program for patients with stable CAD being treated in an outpatient cardiology clinic. Thirty-three patients were randomized to the Intervention Group (IG) or to Treatment as Usual (TAU). Outcome measures were assessed at Post-treatment (two-weeks after Baseline) and at 30-day Follow-up. Reliable change and parametric analyses were used to evaluate study outcomes. Results indicated that the program was both feasible and acceptable to patients, as determined by a priori criteria: over 60 percent of referred and eligible patients agreed to participate, over 75 percent of consented IG participants completed the program through 30-day Follow-up, and over 80 percent of participants reported that they would recommend the program to other patients. With regard to treatment outcomes, data from 28 participants were available. Reliable change analyses revealed that at both Post-treatment and 30-day Follow-up, significantly more IG than TAU participants exhibited an increase in self-efficacy as compared with Baseline. There were no observed between-group differences on other study measures, though repeated-measures ANOVAs were underpowered. Overall, results support the feasibility and acceptability of brief lifestyle interventions in outpatient cardiology care and highlight the role of behavioral health providers on integrated cardiology care teams in helping to increase patient self-efficacy in managing chronic disease.
Title: Brief Behavioral Health Intervention Program for Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease.
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Name(s): Wiener, Chelsea, Author
Cassisi, Jeffrey, Committee Chair
Gupta, Rema, Committee Member
Paulson, Daniel, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Healthy eating, physical activity, stress management, and smoking cessation are widely recognized as essential for preventing and treating coronary artery disease (CAD). Research on lifestyle programs for patients with CAD has largely focused on long-term interventions (e.g., several months to one-year in duration). Further, many studies have recruited patients immediately post-cardiac event. By contrast, evaluation of brief lifestyle interventions for stable patients treated in outpatient cardiology is lacking. The present study evaluated the feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy of a 3-session behavioral health lifestyle program for patients with stable CAD being treated in an outpatient cardiology clinic. Thirty-three patients were randomized to the Intervention Group (IG) or to Treatment as Usual (TAU). Outcome measures were assessed at Post-treatment (two-weeks after Baseline) and at 30-day Follow-up. Reliable change and parametric analyses were used to evaluate study outcomes. Results indicated that the program was both feasible and acceptable to patients, as determined by a priori criteria: over 60 percent of referred and eligible patients agreed to participate, over 75 percent of consented IG participants completed the program through 30-day Follow-up, and over 80 percent of participants reported that they would recommend the program to other patients. With regard to treatment outcomes, data from 28 participants were available. Reliable change analyses revealed that at both Post-treatment and 30-day Follow-up, significantly more IG than TAU participants exhibited an increase in self-efficacy as compared with Baseline. There were no observed between-group differences on other study measures, though repeated-measures ANOVAs were underpowered. Overall, results support the feasibility and acceptability of brief lifestyle interventions in outpatient cardiology care and highlight the role of behavioral health providers on integrated cardiology care teams in helping to increase patient self-efficacy in managing chronic disease.
Identifier: CFE0007876 (IID), ucf:52770 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences,
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): coronary artery disease -- lifestyle program -- brief intervention -- cardiac psychology -- behavioral health
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007876
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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