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STRESS SHIELDING MINIMIZED IN FEMORAL HIP IMPLANTS: A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OPTIMIZED BY VIRTUAL COMPATIBILITY

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Bone mechanics and traditional implant materials produce a recurring problem for patients of total hip arthroplasty (THA): the bone is "shielded" from the loading it has become accustomed to over many years of development. Bone adheres to what is called "Wolff's Law", meaning it is an adaptive structure which adjusts its geometry based on the loads experienced over its life. As the new femoral hip implant transmits reduced stresses to the remaining bone, bone tissue atrophies at the interface, permitting loosening of the implant, pain, and thereby obliging additional surgery to correct the issue. In the present work, a methodology is endeavored for creating an innovative design for femoral hip implants. The approach uncouples the finite element implant model from the bone model, in order to focus solely on expected behavior within the implant while considering the varying material behavior in unique directions and locations. The implant's internal geometry is optimized in order to better match typical, intact bone conditions. The eventual design reduces extreme changes in stresses within remnant bone such that the implant will remain implanted for greater periods of time without additional surgical attention.
Title: STRESS SHIELDING MINIMIZED IN FEMORAL HIP IMPLANTS: A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL OPTIMIZED BY VIRTUAL COMPATIBILITY.
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Name(s): feldt, christian, Author
Chew, Larry, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Bone mechanics and traditional implant materials produce a recurring problem for patients of total hip arthroplasty (THA): the bone is "shielded" from the loading it has become accustomed to over many years of development. Bone adheres to what is called "Wolff's Law", meaning it is an adaptive structure which adjusts its geometry based on the loads experienced over its life. As the new femoral hip implant transmits reduced stresses to the remaining bone, bone tissue atrophies at the interface, permitting loosening of the implant, pain, and thereby obliging additional surgery to correct the issue. In the present work, a methodology is endeavored for creating an innovative design for femoral hip implants. The approach uncouples the finite element implant model from the bone model, in order to focus solely on expected behavior within the implant while considering the varying material behavior in unique directions and locations. The implant's internal geometry is optimized in order to better match typical, intact bone conditions. The eventual design reduces extreme changes in stresses within remnant bone such that the implant will remain implanted for greater periods of time without additional surgical attention.
Identifier: CFE0004051 (IID), ucf:52891 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-08-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): hip implant
stress shielding
optimization
Wolff's Law
bone adaptation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004051
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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