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Writing as a public relations task: how much do public relations practitioners write?

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Date Issued:
1989
Abstract/Description:
University of Central Florida College of Arts and Sciences Thesis; The purpose of this study was to investigate how much public relations people write in the course of their work; to determine if the amount and type of writing varies with experience, job type or employer; and to investigate what other tasks besides writing public relations professionals do. The sample was 198 members of the Public Relations Society of America who responded to a nation-wide mailing of 500 people selected from the Society's membership directory. Results showed that public relations practitioners spent 36.5 percent of their time writing. Overall, public relations people spend more time on publicity, media relations, and business administration than on any other function, but counseling management and research--two emerging area--are rating in the top 50 percent. Thus, while this study does not provide any startling new information on the public relations industry, it does provide, for the first time, empirical evidence of what an average or typical public relations practitioner does. That was the primary goal of the study.
Title: Writing as a public relations task: how much do public relations practitioners write?.
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Name(s): Stansberry, Frank R., Author
Taylor, K. Phillip, Committee Chair
Arts and Sciences, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1989
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: University of Central Florida College of Arts and Sciences Thesis; The purpose of this study was to investigate how much public relations people write in the course of their work; to determine if the amount and type of writing varies with experience, job type or employer; and to investigate what other tasks besides writing public relations professionals do. The sample was 198 members of the Public Relations Society of America who responded to a nation-wide mailing of 500 people selected from the Society's membership directory. Results showed that public relations practitioners spent 36.5 percent of their time writing. Overall, public relations people spend more time on publicity, media relations, and business administration than on any other function, but counseling management and research--two emerging area--are rating in the top 50 percent. Thus, while this study does not provide any startling new information on the public relations industry, it does provide, for the first time, empirical evidence of what an average or typical public relations practitioner does. That was the primary goal of the study.
Identifier: CFR0008148 (IID), ucf:52953 (fedora)
Note(s): 1989-05-01
M.A.
Communications
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Arts and Sciences -- Dissertations
Academic
Dissertations
Academic -- Arts and Sciences
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0008148
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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