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Zooplankton abudance and diversity in central Florida grass carp ponds

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Date Issued:
1978
Abstract/Description:
Florida Technological University College of Natural Sciences Thesis; The effect of the Asian grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella Val.) and aquatic vegetation upon the zooplankton in four adjacent experimental ponds (0.139 ha each) was studied for one year. Zooplankton were collected with a newly designed shallow-water sampler. Pond 1 contained no aquatic vegetation. Ponds 2, 3, and 4 contained nine species of rooted aquatic plants. Grass carp were stocked into Pond 2 (65 per ha) and Pond 3 (611 per ha). Physicochemical parameters were similar among the ponds. Eighty-eight zooplankton species were enumerated. The abundance of zooplankton groups (Rotifera, Cladoceza, and Copepoda) was not significantly different among the ponds containing grass carp. No significant differences existed between Pond 3 (high grass carp stocking rate) and Pond 4 (no carp) for species diversity (d) and species dominance. The number of species and species diversity (d) was found to be significantly different in Pond 2 (low grass carp stocking rate) when compared to Ponds 3 and 4; those differences probably were not due to the grass carp. Grass carp did not appear to affect the water quality of the ponds. In general, it was concluded that grass carp had little, if any, direct or indirect affect upon the zooplankton. Species commonness was greatest among ponds containing vegetation. Rotifers were the dominant zooplankton group in those ponds. Zooplankton ware moat abundant in the pond without vegetation and were dominated by copepods (notably Tropocyclops prasinus). That pond contained the lowest number of species and had the largest species diversity (d) of the ponds. The annual mean for the Simpson Index (species dominance) was highest in Pond 1. The lack of vegetation may have influenced the abundance and diversity of the zooplankton in Pond 1 compared to the other ponds. Those differences also may have been due to selective predation by mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis); that fish was significantly less abundant in Pond 1.
Title: Zooplankton abudance and diversity in central Florida grass carp ponds.
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Name(s): Fry, Douglas Lee, Author
Osborne, John A., Committee Chair
Natural Sciences, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1978
Publisher: Florida Technological University
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Florida Technological University College of Natural Sciences Thesis; The effect of the Asian grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella Val.) and aquatic vegetation upon the zooplankton in four adjacent experimental ponds (0.139 ha each) was studied for one year. Zooplankton were collected with a newly designed shallow-water sampler. Pond 1 contained no aquatic vegetation. Ponds 2, 3, and 4 contained nine species of rooted aquatic plants. Grass carp were stocked into Pond 2 (65 per ha) and Pond 3 (611 per ha). Physicochemical parameters were similar among the ponds. Eighty-eight zooplankton species were enumerated. The abundance of zooplankton groups (Rotifera, Cladoceza, and Copepoda) was not significantly different among the ponds containing grass carp. No significant differences existed between Pond 3 (high grass carp stocking rate) and Pond 4 (no carp) for species diversity (d) and species dominance. The number of species and species diversity (d) was found to be significantly different in Pond 2 (low grass carp stocking rate) when compared to Ponds 3 and 4; those differences probably were not due to the grass carp. Grass carp did not appear to affect the water quality of the ponds. In general, it was concluded that grass carp had little, if any, direct or indirect affect upon the zooplankton. Species commonness was greatest among ponds containing vegetation. Rotifers were the dominant zooplankton group in those ponds. Zooplankton ware moat abundant in the pond without vegetation and were dominated by copepods (notably Tropocyclops prasinus). That pond contained the lowest number of species and had the largest species diversity (d) of the ponds. The annual mean for the Simpson Index (species dominance) was highest in Pond 1. The lack of vegetation may have influenced the abundance and diversity of the zooplankton in Pond 1 compared to the other ponds. Those differences also may have been due to selective predation by mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis); that fish was significantly less abundant in Pond 1.
Identifier: CFR0004339 (IID), ucf:52999 (fedora)
Note(s): 1978-08-01
M.S.
Biological Sciences
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Carp
Freshwater zooplankton -- Florida
Zooplankton -- Florida
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0004339
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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