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An application of a computerized mathematical model for estimating the quantity and quality of nonpoint sources of pollution from small urban and nonurban watersheds

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Date Issued:
1975
Abstract/Description:
Florida Technological University College of Engineering Thesis; The problem of "Total Water Management" is reviewed; particular emphasis is given to the magnitude and intensity of pollution from nonpoint sources. The relationship between land usage in south Florida and subsequent effects upon receiving water bodies is discussed. Basic factors effecting hydrological and ecological subsystems are illustrated. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Urban Storm Water Runoff Mathematical Model, "STORM," is introduced. Model parameters and methodology are discussed. The mathematical relationships and modeling processes are reviewed and the model is exercised using a "new generation" southeast Florida community (The City of Palm Beach Gardens) as the subject of study. It is concluded that the model can be beneficial in supporting estimates of pollutant loading to receiving waters from nonpoint sources. Iteration with the model, varying control facility cost and capacity, provides a cost effective tool for land and water resource planners. However, due to the particular nature of soils, atmospheric and urban conditions in south Florida, the model should be calibrated with input constants and default values derived to more accurately reflect the southeast Florida environment.
Title: An application of a computerized mathematical model for estimating the quantity and quality of nonpoint sources of pollution from small urban and nonurban watersheds.
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Name(s): Ingraham, Charles John, Author
Wanielista, Martin P., Committee Chair
Engineering, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1975
Publisher: Florida Technological University
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Florida Technological University College of Engineering Thesis; The problem of "Total Water Management" is reviewed; particular emphasis is given to the magnitude and intensity of pollution from nonpoint sources. The relationship between land usage in south Florida and subsequent effects upon receiving water bodies is discussed. Basic factors effecting hydrological and ecological subsystems are illustrated. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Urban Storm Water Runoff Mathematical Model, "STORM," is introduced. Model parameters and methodology are discussed. The mathematical relationships and modeling processes are reviewed and the model is exercised using a "new generation" southeast Florida community (The City of Palm Beach Gardens) as the subject of study. It is concluded that the model can be beneficial in supporting estimates of pollutant loading to receiving waters from nonpoint sources. Iteration with the model, varying control facility cost and capacity, provides a cost effective tool for land and water resource planners. However, due to the particular nature of soils, atmospheric and urban conditions in south Florida, the model should be calibrated with input constants and default values derived to more accurately reflect the southeast Florida environment.
Identifier: CFR0003515 (IID), ucf:53006 (fedora)
Note(s): 1975-03-01
M.S.
Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Water -- Pollution -- Mathematical models
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0003515
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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