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Analysis of threaded joint behavior in an airbag module assembly

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Date Issued:
1996
Abstract/Description:
University of Central Florida College of Engineering Thesis; While some of think of our cars as simply "buckets of bolts", the proper design choices, applications, and assemblies of threaded fasteners/bolted joints play critical roles in automobile safety. Supplemental Restraint Systems (SRS), more commonly known as airbags, help prevent vehicle occupants from being thrown forward into the dashboard or windshield in the event of a collision. The components comprising the airbag, the inflator, the backing plate, and the cover are connected to each other, and to the vehicle, through a series of threaded fasteners. Proper and timely deployment of the airbag depends largely on the selection of suitable threaded fasteners at the design stage, appropriate fastener application, and strict adherence to the module assembly process. Selecting suitable fasteners and applying fasteners appropriately requires and understanding of basic fastener concepts: thread definitions, fastener loading terms, stress and strength, and joint failure modes. Knowledge of torque, preload, torque equations, and torque control also is necessary before proper selection and application can occur. The Case Study examines a drivers' side airbag module currently used on a vehicle marketed in the United States and, employing applicable design equations, determines 1.) if the design selction of the threaded fasteners is appropriate, 2.) how the threaded fasteners behave during and after airbag assembly, and during airbag deployment, and 3.) the potential problems arising from loose or missing fasteners. The thesis concludes the design and selection of the fasteners used in the airbag module concurs with the basic principles of threaded joints. Through the cases selected for the modules, the thesis generates several conditions that must be met to prevent joint failures. It is proposed that this research be used to further determine both the design selection of threaded fasteners and the assembly processes of automotive airbag manufacturing.
Title: Analysis of threaded joint behavior in an airbag module assembly.
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Name(s): Chemat, Rustam, Author
Hagedoorn, A. Henry, Committee Chair
Engineering, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1996
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: University of Central Florida College of Engineering Thesis; While some of think of our cars as simply "buckets of bolts", the proper design choices, applications, and assemblies of threaded fasteners/bolted joints play critical roles in automobile safety. Supplemental Restraint Systems (SRS), more commonly known as airbags, help prevent vehicle occupants from being thrown forward into the dashboard or windshield in the event of a collision. The components comprising the airbag, the inflator, the backing plate, and the cover are connected to each other, and to the vehicle, through a series of threaded fasteners. Proper and timely deployment of the airbag depends largely on the selection of suitable threaded fasteners at the design stage, appropriate fastener application, and strict adherence to the module assembly process. Selecting suitable fasteners and applying fasteners appropriately requires and understanding of basic fastener concepts: thread definitions, fastener loading terms, stress and strength, and joint failure modes. Knowledge of torque, preload, torque equations, and torque control also is necessary before proper selection and application can occur. The Case Study examines a drivers' side airbag module currently used on a vehicle marketed in the United States and, employing applicable design equations, determines 1.) if the design selction of the threaded fasteners is appropriate, 2.) how the threaded fasteners behave during and after airbag assembly, and during airbag deployment, and 3.) the potential problems arising from loose or missing fasteners. The thesis concludes the design and selection of the fasteners used in the airbag module concurs with the basic principles of threaded joints. Through the cases selected for the modules, the thesis generates several conditions that must be met to prevent joint failures. It is proposed that this research be used to further determine both the design selection of threaded fasteners and the assembly processes of automotive airbag manufacturing.
Identifier: CFR0010870 (IID), ucf:53054 (fedora)
Note(s): 1996-12-01
M.S.
Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Dissertations
Academic -- Engineering
Engineering -- Dissertations
Academic
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0010870
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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