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Job Characteristics Model: Test of a Modified Four-Trait Model at the University of Central Florida

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Date Issued:
1987
Abstract/Description:
University of Central Florida College of Arts and Sciences Thesis; The study examined the number of significant factors in the Hackman and Oldham (1980) job characteristics model. The original factors were: Skill Variety, Task Significance, Task Identity, Autonomy, and Feedback. Scores on these dimensions for 84 employees of the University of Central Florida (21 supervisory and 63 non-supervisory subjects) were used as the basis for this study through a mail administration of the Hackman and Oldham Job Diagnostic Survey (JDS) and their Job Rating Form (JRF). It was hypothesized that: (a) only four significant job dimensions would emerge from factor analysis of the data; (b) that the motivating potential ratings from job incumbents would be significantly different from those provided by supervisors; and (c) that these motivating potential scores would be significantly lower than the norm for the job families into which those positions fell. the data failed to lend support to any of the preceeding hypotheses. First, only one significant factor (Skill Variety) was extracted from the non-supervisory data while two factors (Skill Variety and Task Identity) were extracted from the supervisory data. Second, incumbents' ratings were not significantly different from those of their supervisors and third, the motivating potential scores of incumbents were found to be higher than the norm for most of the job families sampled in the study.
Title: Job Characteristics Model: Test of a Modified Four-Trait Model at the University of Central Florida.
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Name(s): Cox-Jones, Gena L., Author
Wooten, William, Committee Chair
Arts and Sciences, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1987
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: University of Central Florida College of Arts and Sciences Thesis; The study examined the number of significant factors in the Hackman and Oldham (1980) job characteristics model. The original factors were: Skill Variety, Task Significance, Task Identity, Autonomy, and Feedback. Scores on these dimensions for 84 employees of the University of Central Florida (21 supervisory and 63 non-supervisory subjects) were used as the basis for this study through a mail administration of the Hackman and Oldham Job Diagnostic Survey (JDS) and their Job Rating Form (JRF). It was hypothesized that: (a) only four significant job dimensions would emerge from factor analysis of the data; (b) that the motivating potential ratings from job incumbents would be significantly different from those provided by supervisors; and (c) that these motivating potential scores would be significantly lower than the norm for the job families into which those positions fell. the data failed to lend support to any of the preceeding hypotheses. First, only one significant factor (Skill Variety) was extracted from the non-supervisory data while two factors (Skill Variety and Task Identity) were extracted from the supervisory data. Second, incumbents' ratings were not significantly different from those of their supervisors and third, the motivating potential scores of incumbents were found to be higher than the norm for most of the job families sampled in the study.
Identifier: CFR0008177 (IID), ucf:53060 (fedora)
Note(s): 1987-08-01
M.S.
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Autonomy (Psychology)
Employee motivation
Feedback (Psychology)
Work -- Psychological aspects
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0008177
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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