You are here

DEFINING A PERSON: THE NURSE AT RISK FOR COMPASSION FATIGUE

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2017
Abstract/Description:
The intent of this thesis was to examine compassion fatigue in nurses through analysis of research studies conducted within the past five years in an effort to identify predisposing factors to the experience of compassion fatigue. Individual and institutional factors were identified as well as current strategies to assist with management of compassion fatigue. Findings indicated that being new to practice, having a trait negative affect, being younger in age, having a history of exposure to trauma and working in high emotionally stressful units predisposed individuals to the experience of compassion fatigue. Institutional factors included a lack of managerial support, organizational commitment, group cohesion, work engagement and conflicting expectations of the nurse. Institutional interventions to assist in mitigating compassion fatigue include improving managerial support, developing group cohesion and communication and providing continuing education opportunities. Institutions can also assist by offering training in resiliency techniques such as negative thought pattern identification, meditation, peer-to-peer discussions, journaling about traumatic experiences, identification and maintenance of personal/professional boundaries and physical wellness through exercise and yoga. These proposed interventions address institutional accountability in health care worker wellness as defined by the quadruple aim. Such interventions also address use of Watson's Caring Theory to emphasize the importance of nurse wellness as essential to creating caring nurse-patient relationships.
Title: DEFINING A PERSON: THE NURSE AT RISK FOR COMPASSION FATIGUE.
28 views
13 downloads
Name(s): Johnston, Ellen, Author
Andrews, Diane, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The intent of this thesis was to examine compassion fatigue in nurses through analysis of research studies conducted within the past five years in an effort to identify predisposing factors to the experience of compassion fatigue. Individual and institutional factors were identified as well as current strategies to assist with management of compassion fatigue. Findings indicated that being new to practice, having a trait negative affect, being younger in age, having a history of exposure to trauma and working in high emotionally stressful units predisposed individuals to the experience of compassion fatigue. Institutional factors included a lack of managerial support, organizational commitment, group cohesion, work engagement and conflicting expectations of the nurse. Institutional interventions to assist in mitigating compassion fatigue include improving managerial support, developing group cohesion and communication and providing continuing education opportunities. Institutions can also assist by offering training in resiliency techniques such as negative thought pattern identification, meditation, peer-to-peer discussions, journaling about traumatic experiences, identification and maintenance of personal/professional boundaries and physical wellness through exercise and yoga. These proposed interventions address institutional accountability in health care worker wellness as defined by the quadruple aim. Such interventions also address use of Watson's Caring Theory to emphasize the importance of nurse wellness as essential to creating caring nurse-patient relationships.
Identifier: CFH0000222 (IID), ucf:44675 (fedora)
Note(s): 2017-08-01
B.S.N.
College of Nursing, Nursing
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): compassion fatigue
quadruple aim
jean watson
caring theory
secondary traumatic stress
burnout
triple aim
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0000222
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections