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STUDENT PERCEPTION OF THEIR INSTRUCTORS: DO COLLEGE STUDENTS RATE FEMALE PROFESSORS MORE HARSHLY?

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Date Issued:
2013
Abstract/Description:
Student evaluations are often used by administrators to make important career decisions for professors such as offers of tenure, increase in salary or other monetary reward (see Frick, Chadha, Watson, & Zlatkovska, 2009). Research has consistently shown that helpfulness in its various operational definitions is one of the most important traits to students when evaluating a professor (For example Silva et al., 2008). Previous findings have demonstrated that inequalities exist among subjective student evaluation ratings of men and women, (see Bennet, 1982). The present study extended this research by manipulating the instruction styles (strict vs. permissive), as well as the gender of the instructor, in a hypothetical syllabus. Participants were randomly assigned to read 1 of 4 syllabi which varied only by instruction style and gender of the instructor. Subsequently, participants answered follow up questions on the content of the syllabus which emphasized the gender of the instructor. Evaluations were collected in the form of both Likert scale ratings and responses to open ended questions. The written evaluations were analyzed for emotional content using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count Software (LIWC, Pennebaker, Francis, & Booth, 2007). A 2 (male vs. female) X 2 (strict vs. permissive) between subjects ANOVA was applied to the data collected. The results support the hypothesis that gender inequalities do exist, particularly when the professor was established as having a strict style of student interaction.
Title: STUDENT PERCEPTION OF THEIR INSTRUCTORS: DO COLLEGE STUDENTS RATE FEMALE PROFESSORS MORE HARSHLY?.
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Name(s): Christovich, Courtney, Author
Whitten, Shannon, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Student evaluations are often used by administrators to make important career decisions for professors such as offers of tenure, increase in salary or other monetary reward (see Frick, Chadha, Watson, & Zlatkovska, 2009). Research has consistently shown that helpfulness in its various operational definitions is one of the most important traits to students when evaluating a professor (For example Silva et al., 2008). Previous findings have demonstrated that inequalities exist among subjective student evaluation ratings of men and women, (see Bennet, 1982). The present study extended this research by manipulating the instruction styles (strict vs. permissive), as well as the gender of the instructor, in a hypothetical syllabus. Participants were randomly assigned to read 1 of 4 syllabi which varied only by instruction style and gender of the instructor. Subsequently, participants answered follow up questions on the content of the syllabus which emphasized the gender of the instructor. Evaluations were collected in the form of both Likert scale ratings and responses to open ended questions. The written evaluations were analyzed for emotional content using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count Software (LIWC, Pennebaker, Francis, & Booth, 2007). A 2 (male vs. female) X 2 (strict vs. permissive) between subjects ANOVA was applied to the data collected. The results support the hypothesis that gender inequalities do exist, particularly when the professor was established as having a strict style of student interaction.
Identifier: CFH0004392 (IID), ucf:44994 (fedora)
Note(s): 2013-05-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Gender
Instructor
Teacher
Gender Roles
LIWC
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004392
Restrictions on Access: campus 2018-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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