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ADDRESSING NEED FOR RESEARCH-FOCUSED NURSES BY INCREASING INTEREST AND SOCIALIZATION AT THE UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
The U.S. shortage of qualified nursing teachers and researchers is affecting national health care outcomes. Methods such as fast-tracking Baccalaureate nurses into graduate programs and embedding leadership development early into nursing curricula have been proposed to address faculty and research shortages. Early interest in nursing research careers increases likelihood of enrollment in graduate education. One way undergraduate nursing students may develop an interest in research careers is through a mentored apprenticeship with research-active faculty. In this thesis, the author uses an autoethnography methodology to examine the benefits that a mentored research apprenticeship model brought to her undergraduate experience. Her experience incorporated a variety of roles in an adolescent intervention program with Dr. Anne Norris (PI) at the University of Central Florida College of Nursing. Several themes about the experience were defined in the results. Early research exposure that socializes a student to the nursing research world may provide a means for addressing the nursing faculty shortage. This socialization can generate interest in a research career and promote undergraduate students with the essential tools and insights needed to pursue this career pathway. However, findings from this study suggest a student-mentor relationship early in the undergraduate education experience is essential.
Title: ADDRESSING NEED FOR RESEARCH-FOCUSED NURSES BY INCREASING INTEREST AND SOCIALIZATION AT THE UNDERGRADUATE LEVEL.
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Name(s): Thomas, Sarah, Author
Norris, Anne, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The U.S. shortage of qualified nursing teachers and researchers is affecting national health care outcomes. Methods such as fast-tracking Baccalaureate nurses into graduate programs and embedding leadership development early into nursing curricula have been proposed to address faculty and research shortages. Early interest in nursing research careers increases likelihood of enrollment in graduate education. One way undergraduate nursing students may develop an interest in research careers is through a mentored apprenticeship with research-active faculty. In this thesis, the author uses an autoethnography methodology to examine the benefits that a mentored research apprenticeship model brought to her undergraduate experience. Her experience incorporated a variety of roles in an adolescent intervention program with Dr. Anne Norris (PI) at the University of Central Florida College of Nursing. Several themes about the experience were defined in the results. Early research exposure that socializes a student to the nursing research world may provide a means for addressing the nursing faculty shortage. This socialization can generate interest in a research career and promote undergraduate students with the essential tools and insights needed to pursue this career pathway. However, findings from this study suggest a student-mentor relationship early in the undergraduate education experience is essential.
Identifier: CFH0004594 (IID), ucf:45232 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-05-01
B.S.N.
Nursing, College of Nursing
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): undergraduate
nursing
nurse
autoethnography
research
socialize
socialization
experience
exposure
teach
teaching
education
educate
increase
increasing
mentor
mentorship
mentoring
apprentice
apprenticeship
mentorship model
faculty-student relationship
nursing shortage
graduate nursing shortage
PhD
nursing research
bachelor
BSN
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004594
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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