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DEINDIVIDUATION OF DRIVERS: IS EVERYONE ELSE A BAD DRIVER?

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
Deindividuation is a psychological phenomenon that occurs when a given environment reduces the "individuality" or identifiability of a person. These environments may cause a psychological reduction in self-consciousness, potentially leading to violations of sociocultural norms (Festinger, Pepitone, & Newcomb, 1952; Singer, Brush, & Lublin, 1965). The present research sought to empirically test deindividuation theory among automobile drivers utilizing the anonymizing factor of observation. Participants (N = 31) used a driving simulator and were either in the observed condition or an unobserved condition. Analysis of driving data did not reveal significant results, however self-report data had some interesting trends. Though limited in scope, this research begins to shed light on deindividuation of drivers and may provide a foundation for future research.
Title: DEINDIVIDUATION OF DRIVERS: IS EVERYONE ELSE A BAD DRIVER?.
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Name(s): MacArthur, Keith, Author
Hancock, Peter, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Deindividuation is a psychological phenomenon that occurs when a given environment reduces the "individuality" or identifiability of a person. These environments may cause a psychological reduction in self-consciousness, potentially leading to violations of sociocultural norms (Festinger, Pepitone, & Newcomb, 1952; Singer, Brush, & Lublin, 1965). The present research sought to empirically test deindividuation theory among automobile drivers utilizing the anonymizing factor of observation. Participants (N = 31) used a driving simulator and were either in the observed condition or an unobserved condition. Analysis of driving data did not reveal significant results, however self-report data had some interesting trends. Though limited in scope, this research begins to shed light on deindividuation of drivers and may provide a foundation for future research.
Identifier: CFH0004644 (IID), ucf:45325 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-08-01
B.S.
Sciences, Dept. of Psychology
Bachelors
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Deindividuation
De-individuation
individuation
driving
drivers
anonymity
deception
observed
observation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFH0004644
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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