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HISPANICS' ATTITUDES TOWARD SEEKING COUNSELINGAS A FUNCTION OF PSYCHOSOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
Using variables identified in the social science literature believed to influence attitudes toward seeking professional counseling, an attempt was made to develop a model for predicting Hispanics' willingness to obtain professional help. A second purpose of this study was to compare college students (n = 158) with their parents on their attitudes toward mental illness and toward seeking counseling. Among predictor variables, social stigma and the belief that mental illnesses are untreatable were the primary variables predicting attitudes toward seeking counseling. The more college students and their parents perceived there to be social stigma attached to those seeking therapy, and the more parents believed that mental illnesses are untreatable, the less favorable attitudes they had about seeking professional help. These attitudes were linked to their acculturation levels; in general, the more acculturated they were toward the Hispanic culture, the more pejorative their attitudes were toward mental illness and their willingness to seek professional help. Last, college students in general had significantly more positive attitudes toward mental illness and professional counseling than their parents. Recommendations for providing counseling with Hispanic clients are provided in the context of the present findings.
Title: HISPANICS' ATTITUDES TOWARD SEEKING COUNSELINGAS A FUNCTION OF PSYCHOSOCIAL AND DEMOGRAPHIC VARIABLES.
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Name(s): Rojas-Vilches, Angela, Author
Negy, Charles, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Using variables identified in the social science literature believed to influence attitudes toward seeking professional counseling, an attempt was made to develop a model for predicting Hispanics' willingness to obtain professional help. A second purpose of this study was to compare college students (n = 158) with their parents on their attitudes toward mental illness and toward seeking counseling. Among predictor variables, social stigma and the belief that mental illnesses are untreatable were the primary variables predicting attitudes toward seeking counseling. The more college students and their parents perceived there to be social stigma attached to those seeking therapy, and the more parents believed that mental illnesses are untreatable, the less favorable attitudes they had about seeking professional help. These attitudes were linked to their acculturation levels; in general, the more acculturated they were toward the Hispanic culture, the more pejorative their attitudes were toward mental illness and their willingness to seek professional help. Last, college students in general had significantly more positive attitudes toward mental illness and professional counseling than their parents. Recommendations for providing counseling with Hispanic clients are provided in the context of the present findings.
Identifier: CFE0001028 (IID), ucf:46804 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-05-01
Ph.D.
Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Hispanics
attitudes
help seeking behavior
minorities.
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001028
Restrictions on Access: campus 2007-01-31
Host Institution: UCF

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