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THE DARK SIDE OF THE TUNE: A STUDY OF VILLAINS

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
On "championing" the villain, there is a naïve quality that must be maintained even though the actor has rehearsed his tragic ending several times. There is a subtle difference between "to charm" and "to seduce." The need for fame, glory, power, money, or other objects of affection drives antagonists so blindly that they've no hope of regaining a consciousness about their actions. If and when they do become aware, they infrequently feel remorse. I captured the essence of the villain by exposing these lightless characters to the sun. On Monday, April 9th and Tuesday, April 17th, 2007, on the Gillespie stage in Daytona Beach, Florida, I performed a thirty-minute, one-act cabaret entitled The Dark Side of the Tune. By selecting pieces from the musical theatre genre to define and demonstrate the qualities of the stock character, the villain, I created a one-man show; a musical play, including an inciting incident, rising conflict, climax, and dénouement, with only a few moments of my own dialogue to help handle the unique transitions for my own particular story. By analyzing the arc of major historical villains and comparing them to some of the current dark characters, I will discuss the progression of the villain's role within a production and the change from the clearly defined villain to modern misfits who are frequently far less scheming or obvious. My research includes analysis of the dark references within each piece's originating production, and how it has been integrated into the script for The Dark Side of the Tune and a breakdown of my cabaret's script (Appendix A). I explore actors' tools, specifically voice, movement, and characterization, and their use in creating villainous characters. I also discuss similarities in story progression for the deviant's beginning, middle, and final positions within the plot structure of a production.
Title: THE DARK SIDE OF THE TUNE: A STUDY OF VILLAINS.
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Name(s): Biggs, Michael, Author
Weaver, Earl, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: On "championing" the villain, there is a naïve quality that must be maintained even though the actor has rehearsed his tragic ending several times. There is a subtle difference between "to charm" and "to seduce." The need for fame, glory, power, money, or other objects of affection drives antagonists so blindly that they've no hope of regaining a consciousness about their actions. If and when they do become aware, they infrequently feel remorse. I captured the essence of the villain by exposing these lightless characters to the sun. On Monday, April 9th and Tuesday, April 17th, 2007, on the Gillespie stage in Daytona Beach, Florida, I performed a thirty-minute, one-act cabaret entitled The Dark Side of the Tune. By selecting pieces from the musical theatre genre to define and demonstrate the qualities of the stock character, the villain, I created a one-man show; a musical play, including an inciting incident, rising conflict, climax, and dénouement, with only a few moments of my own dialogue to help handle the unique transitions for my own particular story. By analyzing the arc of major historical villains and comparing them to some of the current dark characters, I will discuss the progression of the villain's role within a production and the change from the clearly defined villain to modern misfits who are frequently far less scheming or obvious. My research includes analysis of the dark references within each piece's originating production, and how it has been integrated into the script for The Dark Side of the Tune and a breakdown of my cabaret's script (Appendix A). I explore actors' tools, specifically voice, movement, and characterization, and their use in creating villainous characters. I also discuss similarities in story progression for the deviant's beginning, middle, and final positions within the plot structure of a production.
Identifier: CFE0002446 (IID), ucf:47709 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-12-01
M.F.A.
Arts and Humanities, Department of Theatre
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): text analysis
protagonist
villain
cabaret
Daytona News Journal
false beginning
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002446
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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