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EFFECTS OF 3D STEREOSCOPY, VISUO-SPATIAL WORKING MEMORY, AND PERCEPTIONS OF SIMULATION EXPERIENCE ON THE MEMORIZATION OF CONFUSABLE OBJECTS

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
This dissertation investigated the impact of active stereoscopic 3-dimensional (3D) imagery equipment and individual differences in visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM) capacity on retention of a set of similar, novel objects (i.e., armored military vehicles). Seventy-one participants were assessed on their visuo-spatial working memory using the Visual Patterns Test (Della Sala, Gray, Baddeley, & Wilson, 1997). They were then assigned to one of four different conditions (3D high VSWM, 3D low VSWM, 2D high VSWM, 2D low VSWM) based upon their visuo-spatial working memory. Participants were then trained to identify military vehicles using a simulation that presented the training stimuli in one of two dimensionalities, i.e. two dimensional (2D) or active stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D). Testing consisted of a vehicle memory training assessment, which challenged participants to choose the correct components of each vehicle immediately after studying; a measure of retention for military vehicles which asked participants to categorize the alliance and identify previously studied vehicles; and a transfer measure using video footage of actual military vehicles. The latter measures depicted military vehicles in an array of combat situations, and participants were asked to decide on whether or not to shoot each vehicle, as well as identify the vehicles. Testing occurred immediately after training. The moderating, as well as main effects, of VSWM were assessed. The mediating/moderating effects of several experiential factors were measured as well, including: immersion, presence, engagement, flow state, and technology acceptance. Findings indicate that perceptions of the simulation experience and VSWM are strong positive predictors of performance, while 3D was not predictive, and in some instances, significantly worse than the 2D condition. These findings indicate that individual differences in visual memory and user experiences during the SBT both are predictive factors in memory tasks for confusable objects. The SBT designed in this study also led to robust prediction of training outcomes on the final transfer task.
Title: EFFECTS OF 3D STEREOSCOPY, VISUO-SPATIAL WORKING MEMORY, AND PERCEPTIONS OF SIMULATION EXPERIENCE ON THE MEMORIZATION OF CONFUSABLE OBJECTS.
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Name(s): Keebler, Joseph, Author
Jentsch, Florian, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This dissertation investigated the impact of active stereoscopic 3-dimensional (3D) imagery equipment and individual differences in visuo-spatial working memory (VSWM) capacity on retention of a set of similar, novel objects (i.e., armored military vehicles). Seventy-one participants were assessed on their visuo-spatial working memory using the Visual Patterns Test (Della Sala, Gray, Baddeley, & Wilson, 1997). They were then assigned to one of four different conditions (3D high VSWM, 3D low VSWM, 2D high VSWM, 2D low VSWM) based upon their visuo-spatial working memory. Participants were then trained to identify military vehicles using a simulation that presented the training stimuli in one of two dimensionalities, i.e. two dimensional (2D) or active stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D). Testing consisted of a vehicle memory training assessment, which challenged participants to choose the correct components of each vehicle immediately after studying; a measure of retention for military vehicles which asked participants to categorize the alliance and identify previously studied vehicles; and a transfer measure using video footage of actual military vehicles. The latter measures depicted military vehicles in an array of combat situations, and participants were asked to decide on whether or not to shoot each vehicle, as well as identify the vehicles. Testing occurred immediately after training. The moderating, as well as main effects, of VSWM were assessed. The mediating/moderating effects of several experiential factors were measured as well, including: immersion, presence, engagement, flow state, and technology acceptance. Findings indicate that perceptions of the simulation experience and VSWM are strong positive predictors of performance, while 3D was not predictive, and in some instances, significantly worse than the 2D condition. These findings indicate that individual differences in visual memory and user experiences during the SBT both are predictive factors in memory tasks for confusable objects. The SBT designed in this study also led to robust prediction of training outcomes on the final transfer task.
Identifier: CFE0003939 (IID), ucf:48702 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): 3D stereoscopy
Visuo-Spatial Working Memory
Simulation-based training
Combat Identification
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003939
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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