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INVESTIGATING THE OPTIMAL PRESENTATION OF FEEDBACK IN SIMULATION-BASED TRAINING: AN APPLICATION OF THE COGNITIVE THEORY OF MULTIMEDIA LEARNING

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
There are many different training interventions that can be used in simulation based training systems (e.g., cueing, hinting, highlighting, deliberate practice, etc.). However, the most widely used training intervention in the military is feedback, most often presented in the form of a debrief. With advances in technology, it is possible to measure and diagnose performance in real-time. Thus it is possible to provide immediate feedback during scenarios. However, training systems designers should not consider the timing of feedback in isolation. There are other parameters of feedback that must also be considered which may have an impact on performance. Specifically, feedback content and modality may also have an impact on the appropriate timing of feedback and its' effectiveness in simulation training environments. Moreno and Mayer (2000) propose a cognitive theory of multimedia learning which describes how instruction is perceived and processed by a trainee. Using this theoretical framework, I investigate the optimal use of feedback while considering the interaction of feedback timing, content, and modality in scenario-based training environments. In order to investigate the relationship between the timing, modality, and content of feedback, a 2 (immediate, delayed) X 2 (visual, auditory) X 2 (process, outcome) between-subjects design was used (a no feedback control condition was also included). Ninety participants were randomly assigned to the nine experimental groups. These participants performed a visual-spatial military task called the Forward Observer PC-based Simulation. Results indicated that receiving feedback was beneficial to improve performance as compared to receiving no feedback. As hypothesized, during a visual-spatial task, auditory feedback presented during a scenario led to higher performance than visual feedback. Finally, while I did not support my hypothesis that an interaction between all three components of feedback would affect performance, it is promising that the pattern of results mirrored the hypothesized pattern. Theoretical and practical implications, as well as limitations of the current study and directions for future research are discussed.
Title: INVESTIGATING THE OPTIMAL PRESENTATION OF FEEDBACK IN SIMULATION-BASED TRAINING: AN APPLICATION OF THE COGNITIVE THEORY OF MULTIMEDIA LEARNING.
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Name(s): Van Buskirk, Wendi, Author
Bowers, Clint, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: There are many different training interventions that can be used in simulation based training systems (e.g., cueing, hinting, highlighting, deliberate practice, etc.). However, the most widely used training intervention in the military is feedback, most often presented in the form of a debrief. With advances in technology, it is possible to measure and diagnose performance in real-time. Thus it is possible to provide immediate feedback during scenarios. However, training systems designers should not consider the timing of feedback in isolation. There are other parameters of feedback that must also be considered which may have an impact on performance. Specifically, feedback content and modality may also have an impact on the appropriate timing of feedback and its' effectiveness in simulation training environments. Moreno and Mayer (2000) propose a cognitive theory of multimedia learning which describes how instruction is perceived and processed by a trainee. Using this theoretical framework, I investigate the optimal use of feedback while considering the interaction of feedback timing, content, and modality in scenario-based training environments. In order to investigate the relationship between the timing, modality, and content of feedback, a 2 (immediate, delayed) X 2 (visual, auditory) X 2 (process, outcome) between-subjects design was used (a no feedback control condition was also included). Ninety participants were randomly assigned to the nine experimental groups. These participants performed a visual-spatial military task called the Forward Observer PC-based Simulation. Results indicated that receiving feedback was beneficial to improve performance as compared to receiving no feedback. As hypothesized, during a visual-spatial task, auditory feedback presented during a scenario led to higher performance than visual feedback. Finally, while I did not support my hypothesis that an interaction between all three components of feedback would affect performance, it is promising that the pattern of results mirrored the hypothesized pattern. Theoretical and practical implications, as well as limitations of the current study and directions for future research are discussed.
Identifier: CFE0003604 (IID), ucf:48875 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Feedback
scenario-based training
modallity
information processing
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003604
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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