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Heat Transfer in a Coupled Impingement-Effusion Cooling System

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
The efficiency of air-breathing gas turbine engines improves as the combustion temperature increases. Therefore, modern gas turbines operate at temperatures greater than the melting temperature of hot-gas-path components, and cooling must be introduced in order to maintain mechanical integrity of those components. Two highly effective techniques used in modern designs for this purpose are impingement cooling and use of coolant film on hot-gas-path surface introduced through discrete film or effusion holes. In this study, these two mechanisms are coupled into a single prototype cooling system. The heat transfer capability of this system is experimentally determined for a variety of different geometries and coolant flow rates.This study utilizes Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) in order to measure temperature distribution over a surface, which allowed for local impingement Nusselt number, film cooling effectiveness, and film cooling heat transfer enhancement profiles to be obtained. In addition to providing quantitative heat transfer data, this method allowed for qualitative investigation of the flow behavior near the test surface. Impinging jet-to-target-plate spacing was varied over a large range, including several tall impingement scenarios outside the published limits. Additionally, both in-line and staggered effusion arrangements were studied, and results for normal injection were compared to full coverage film cooling with inclined- and compound-angle injection. Effects of impingement and effusion cooling were combined to determine the overall cooling effectiveness of the system.It is shown that low impingement heights produce the highest Nusselt number, and that large jet-to-jet spacing reduces coolant flow rate while maintaining moderate to high heat transfer rates. Staggered effusion configurations exhibit superior performance to in-line configurations, as jet interference is reduced and surface area coverage is improved. Coolant to mainstream flow mass flux ratios greater than unity result in jet blow-off and reduced effectiveness. The convective heat transfer coefficient on the film cooled surface is higher than a similar surface without coolant injection due to the generation of turbulence associated with jet-cross flow interaction.
Title: Heat Transfer in a Coupled Impingement-Effusion Cooling System.
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Name(s): Miller, Mark, Author
Kapat, Jayanta, Committee Chair
Deng, Weiwei, Committee Member
Gordon, Ali, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The efficiency of air-breathing gas turbine engines improves as the combustion temperature increases. Therefore, modern gas turbines operate at temperatures greater than the melting temperature of hot-gas-path components, and cooling must be introduced in order to maintain mechanical integrity of those components. Two highly effective techniques used in modern designs for this purpose are impingement cooling and use of coolant film on hot-gas-path surface introduced through discrete film or effusion holes. In this study, these two mechanisms are coupled into a single prototype cooling system. The heat transfer capability of this system is experimentally determined for a variety of different geometries and coolant flow rates.This study utilizes Temperature Sensitive Paint (TSP) in order to measure temperature distribution over a surface, which allowed for local impingement Nusselt number, film cooling effectiveness, and film cooling heat transfer enhancement profiles to be obtained. In addition to providing quantitative heat transfer data, this method allowed for qualitative investigation of the flow behavior near the test surface. Impinging jet-to-target-plate spacing was varied over a large range, including several tall impingement scenarios outside the published limits. Additionally, both in-line and staggered effusion arrangements were studied, and results for normal injection were compared to full coverage film cooling with inclined- and compound-angle injection. Effects of impingement and effusion cooling were combined to determine the overall cooling effectiveness of the system.It is shown that low impingement heights produce the highest Nusselt number, and that large jet-to-jet spacing reduces coolant flow rate while maintaining moderate to high heat transfer rates. Staggered effusion configurations exhibit superior performance to in-line configurations, as jet interference is reduced and surface area coverage is improved. Coolant to mainstream flow mass flux ratios greater than unity result in jet blow-off and reduced effectiveness. The convective heat transfer coefficient on the film cooled surface is higher than a similar surface without coolant injection due to the generation of turbulence associated with jet-cross flow interaction.
Identifier: CFE0004140 (IID), ucf:49042 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-12-01
M.S.M.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): heat transfer -- fluid dynamics -- gas turbine cooling -- impingement -- effusion -- film cooling -- temperature sensitive paint
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004140
Restrictions on Access: public 2011-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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