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Bootstrapping Cognitive Radio Networks

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Cognitive radio networks promise more efficient spectrum utilization by leveraging degrees of freedom and distributing data collection. The actual realization of these promises is challenged by distributed control, and incomplete, uncertain and possibly conflicting knowledge bases. We consider two problems in bootstrapping, evolving, and managing cognitive radio networks. The first is Link Rendezvous, or how separate radio nodes initially find each other in a spectrum band with many degrees of freedom, and little shared knowledge. The second is how radio nodes can negotiate for spectrum access with incomplete information.To address the first problem, we present our Frequency Parallel Blind Link Rendezvous algorithm. This approach, designed for recent generations of digital front-ends, implicitly shares vague information about spectrum occupancy early in the process, speeding the progress towards a solution. Furthermore, it operates in the frequency domain, facilitating a parallel channel rendezvous. Finally, it operates without a control channel and can rendezvous anywhere in the operating band. We present simulations and analysis on the false alarm rate for both a feature detector and a cross-correlation detector. We compare our results to the conventional frequency hopping sequence rendezvous techniques.To address the second problem, we model the network as a multi-agent system and negotiate by exchanging proposals, augmented with arguments. These arguments include information about priority status and the existence of other nodes. We show in a variety of network topologies that this process leads to solutions not otherwise apparent to individual nodes, and achieves superior network throughput, request satisfaction, and total number of connections, compared to our baselines. The agents independently formulate proposals based upon communication desires, evaluate these proposals based upon capacity constraints, create arguments in response to proposal rejections, and re-evaluate proposals based upon received arguments. We present our negotiation rules, messages, and protocol and demonstrate how they interoperate in a simulation environment.
Title: Bootstrapping Cognitive Radio Networks.
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Name(s): Horine, Brent, Author
Turgut, Damla, Committee Chair
Wei, Lei, Committee Member
Boloni, Ladislau, Committee Member
Sukthankar, Gita, Committee Member
Garibay, Ivan, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Cognitive radio networks promise more efficient spectrum utilization by leveraging degrees of freedom and distributing data collection. The actual realization of these promises is challenged by distributed control, and incomplete, uncertain and possibly conflicting knowledge bases. We consider two problems in bootstrapping, evolving, and managing cognitive radio networks. The first is Link Rendezvous, or how separate radio nodes initially find each other in a spectrum band with many degrees of freedom, and little shared knowledge. The second is how radio nodes can negotiate for spectrum access with incomplete information.To address the first problem, we present our Frequency Parallel Blind Link Rendezvous algorithm. This approach, designed for recent generations of digital front-ends, implicitly shares vague information about spectrum occupancy early in the process, speeding the progress towards a solution. Furthermore, it operates in the frequency domain, facilitating a parallel channel rendezvous. Finally, it operates without a control channel and can rendezvous anywhere in the operating band. We present simulations and analysis on the false alarm rate for both a feature detector and a cross-correlation detector. We compare our results to the conventional frequency hopping sequence rendezvous techniques.To address the second problem, we model the network as a multi-agent system and negotiate by exchanging proposals, augmented with arguments. These arguments include information about priority status and the existence of other nodes. We show in a variety of network topologies that this process leads to solutions not otherwise apparent to individual nodes, and achieves superior network throughput, request satisfaction, and total number of connections, compared to our baselines. The agents independently formulate proposals based upon communication desires, evaluate these proposals based upon capacity constraints, create arguments in response to proposal rejections, and re-evaluate proposals based upon received arguments. We present our negotiation rules, messages, and protocol and demonstrate how they interoperate in a simulation environment.
Identifier: CFE0004546 (IID), ucf:49240 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Cognitive Radio -- Link Rendezvous -- Argumentation -- Negotiation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004546
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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