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Tailoring Instruction to the individual: Investigating the Utility of Trainee Aptitudes for use in Adaptive Training

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Computer-based training has become more prolific as the military and private businessenterprises search for more efficient ways to deliver training. However, some methods ofcomputer-based training are not more effective than traditional classroom methods. Onetechnique that may be able to approximate the most effective form of training, one-on-onetutoring, is Adaptive Training (AT). AT techniques use instruction that is tailored to the learnerin some way, and can adjust different training parameters such as difficulty, feedback, pace, anddelivery mode.There are many ways to adapt training to the learner, and in this study I exploredadapting the feedback provided to trainees based on spatial ability in line with Cognitive LoadTheory (CLT). In line with the CLT expertise reversal effect literature I hypothesized that for aspatial task, higher ability trainees would perform better when they were given less feedback.Alternately, I hypothesized that lower ability trainees would perform better during training whenthey were given more support via feedback. This study also compared two different adaptationapproaches. The first approach, called the ATI approach, adapts feedback based on a premeasuredability. In this case, it was spatial ability. The second approach, called the Hybridapproach adapts initially based on ability, but then based on performance later in training. Ihypothesized that participants who received Hybrid adaptive training would perform better.The study employed a 2(spatial ability; high, low) X 2(feedback; matched, mismatched)X 2 (approach; ATI, Hybrid) between-subjects design in which participants were randomlyassigned to one of the eight conditions. Ninety-two participants completed a submarine-basedperiscope operator task that was visual and spatial in nature. ivThe results of the study did not support the use of CLT-derived adaptation based onspatial ability; contrary to what was hypothesized, higher ability participants who received morefeedback performed better than those who received less. Similarly, lower ability participantswho received less feedback performed better than those who received more. While notsignificant, results suggested there may be some benefit to using the Hybrid approach, but moreresearch is needed to determine the relative effectiveness of this approach.
Title: Tailoring Instruction to the individual: Investigating the Utility of Trainee Aptitudes for use in Adaptive Training.
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Name(s): Landsberg, Carla, Author
Mouloua, Mustapha, Committee Chair
Bowers, Clint, Committee Member
Neider, Mark, Committee Member
Van Buskirk, Wendi, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Computer-based training has become more prolific as the military and private businessenterprises search for more efficient ways to deliver training. However, some methods ofcomputer-based training are not more effective than traditional classroom methods. Onetechnique that may be able to approximate the most effective form of training, one-on-onetutoring, is Adaptive Training (AT). AT techniques use instruction that is tailored to the learnerin some way, and can adjust different training parameters such as difficulty, feedback, pace, anddelivery mode.There are many ways to adapt training to the learner, and in this study I exploredadapting the feedback provided to trainees based on spatial ability in line with Cognitive LoadTheory (CLT). In line with the CLT expertise reversal effect literature I hypothesized that for aspatial task, higher ability trainees would perform better when they were given less feedback.Alternately, I hypothesized that lower ability trainees would perform better during training whenthey were given more support via feedback. This study also compared two different adaptationapproaches. The first approach, called the ATI approach, adapts feedback based on a premeasuredability. In this case, it was spatial ability. The second approach, called the Hybridapproach adapts initially based on ability, but then based on performance later in training. Ihypothesized that participants who received Hybrid adaptive training would perform better.The study employed a 2(spatial ability; high, low) X 2(feedback; matched, mismatched)X 2 (approach; ATI, Hybrid) between-subjects design in which participants were randomlyassigned to one of the eight conditions. Ninety-two participants completed a submarine-basedperiscope operator task that was visual and spatial in nature. ivThe results of the study did not support the use of CLT-derived adaptation based onspatial ability; contrary to what was hypothesized, higher ability participants who received morefeedback performed better than those who received less. Similarly, lower ability participantswho received less feedback performed better than those who received more. While notsignificant, results suggested there may be some benefit to using the Hybrid approach, but moreresearch is needed to determine the relative effectiveness of this approach.
Identifier: CFE0005646 (IID), ucf:50191 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Adaptive Training -- Cognitive Load Theory -- Computer-based Training -- Spatial Ability -- Aptitude Treatment Interaction -- Hybrid Adaptive Training -- Feedback
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005646
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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