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Examining the Impact of Error Encouragement on Training Outcomes

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract/Description:
Error management training has been praised as an effective strategy for facilitating adaptive transfer. However, potential variations have not yet been examined to determine if an alternative format may be equally or more effective. As standard practice, error-related instructions in error management training encourage learners to make errors and to view these errors as learning opportunities. Also, an overwhelming majority of research on this topic has focused learner development of procedural computer software skills. The empirical literature provides little guidance in terms of the boundaries within which error management training is an effective training approach. The purpose of this research was to examine the relative effectiveness of a modified error management training approach for influencing adaptive transfer in contrast to both standard error management training and error avoidant training. The modified error management approach encouraged learners to do their best to avoid errors, but maintained traditional instructions to learn from errors. The effectiveness of these three training conditions for promoting adaptive transfer was examined in two studies. The first study applied the error strategies to a complex decision-making task, and the second study compared the strategies relative effectiveness for a fine motor skills task. Study 1 results indicated that both error management training approaches were associated with higher adaptive learning compared to an error avoidant training approach. Error management and the modified error management did not significantly differ. In Study 2, error management training and error avoidant training both demonstrated greater adaptive transfer than did the modified approach. The mediating roles of metacognition and emotion regulation were examined, but unsupported, in both studies. Implications for future research and organizational practice are discussed.
Title: Examining the Impact of Error Encouragement on Training Outcomes.
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Name(s): Lyons, Rebecca, Author
Salas, Eduardo, Committee Chair
Jentsch, Florian, Committee Member
Joseph, Dana, Committee Member
Cendan, Juan, Committee Member
Burke, Shawn, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Error management training has been praised as an effective strategy for facilitating adaptive transfer. However, potential variations have not yet been examined to determine if an alternative format may be equally or more effective. As standard practice, error-related instructions in error management training encourage learners to make errors and to view these errors as learning opportunities. Also, an overwhelming majority of research on this topic has focused learner development of procedural computer software skills. The empirical literature provides little guidance in terms of the boundaries within which error management training is an effective training approach. The purpose of this research was to examine the relative effectiveness of a modified error management training approach for influencing adaptive transfer in contrast to both standard error management training and error avoidant training. The modified error management approach encouraged learners to do their best to avoid errors, but maintained traditional instructions to learn from errors. The effectiveness of these three training conditions for promoting adaptive transfer was examined in two studies. The first study applied the error strategies to a complex decision-making task, and the second study compared the strategies relative effectiveness for a fine motor skills task. Study 1 results indicated that both error management training approaches were associated with higher adaptive learning compared to an error avoidant training approach. Error management and the modified error management did not significantly differ. In Study 2, error management training and error avoidant training both demonstrated greater adaptive transfer than did the modified approach. The mediating roles of metacognition and emotion regulation were examined, but unsupported, in both studies. Implications for future research and organizational practice are discussed.
Identifier: CFE0005372 (IID), ucf:50444 (fedora)
Note(s): 2014-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): error management training
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005372
Restrictions on Access: campus 2017-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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