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The Education Pathway Through Social and Economic Integration of Highly Educated Immigrants: The Case of Colombians in the United States.

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Date Issued:
2015
Abstract/Description:
Developed countries have promoted immigration of educated people as a strategy to satisfy the demand for educated labor. Highly educated immigrants' poor language skills, absence of cultural networks, and lack of credentials and recognized professional experience gained in the country of origin are barriers to their social and economic integration (Ferrer (&) Riddell, 2008; Mattoo, Neagu, (&) ?zden, 2008; Miranda (&) Umhoefer, 1998; Zikic, Bonache, (&) Cerdin, 2010). The purpose of this study was to explore how college experiences in an American college or university facilitate or hinder the transfer and gain of different forms of capital among highly educated Colombia immigrants. All of the participants in this study completed at least a bachelor's degree before moving to the United States and came to this country under any visa category except that of student. Two in-depth interviews were conducted with six Colombian immigrants living in the state of Florida. The results of the study revealed five common themes shared by the participants: (1) exposure and exchange of different forms of thinking and cultural expressions; (2) performing in ways that meet requirements of American institutions; (3) achieving credentials recognized by professionals in the United States' job market and social structure; (4) capacity to assess their own abilities and take control of their future; and (5) connections that provide social, emotional, and intellectual support as well as information.
Title: The Education Pathway Through Social and Economic Integration of Highly Educated Immigrants: The Case of Colombians in the United States.
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Name(s): Bedoya Arturo, Olga, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Owens, J. Thomas, Committee Member
Laureano Fuentes, Gloria, Committee Member
Rivera, Fernando, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Developed countries have promoted immigration of educated people as a strategy to satisfy the demand for educated labor. Highly educated immigrants' poor language skills, absence of cultural networks, and lack of credentials and recognized professional experience gained in the country of origin are barriers to their social and economic integration (Ferrer (&) Riddell, 2008; Mattoo, Neagu, (&) ?zden, 2008; Miranda (&) Umhoefer, 1998; Zikic, Bonache, (&) Cerdin, 2010). The purpose of this study was to explore how college experiences in an American college or university facilitate or hinder the transfer and gain of different forms of capital among highly educated Colombia immigrants. All of the participants in this study completed at least a bachelor's degree before moving to the United States and came to this country under any visa category except that of student. Two in-depth interviews were conducted with six Colombian immigrants living in the state of Florida. The results of the study revealed five common themes shared by the participants: (1) exposure and exchange of different forms of thinking and cultural expressions; (2) performing in ways that meet requirements of American institutions; (3) achieving credentials recognized by professionals in the United States' job market and social structure; (4) capacity to assess their own abilities and take control of their future; and (5) connections that provide social, emotional, and intellectual support as well as information.
Identifier: CFE0005923 (IID), ucf:50828 (fedora)
Note(s): 2015-12-01
Ed.D.
Education and Human Performance, Child, Family, and Community Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Higher Education -- Immigrants -- human capital -- social capital -- cultural capital -- college degree
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0005923
Restrictions on Access: public 2015-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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