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E.A.I. Anxiety: Technopanic and Post-Human Potential

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Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
Robots have been a part of the imagination of Western culture for centuries. The possibility for automation and artificial life has inspired the curiosity of thinkers like Leonardo Da Vinci who once designed a mechanical knight. It wasn't until the 19th century that automated machinery has become realized. The confrontation between human and automation has inspired a fear, referred to as (")technopanic("), that has been exacerbated in tandem with the evolution of technology. This thesis seeks to discover the historical precedence for these fears. I explore three modes of knowledge (Philosophy, Economics, and Film Theory) to examine the agendas behind the messages on the topic of Artificial Life, specifically Robots. I then advocate for an alternative philosophy called Post-Humanism. I argue that what is needed to alleviate the fears and anxieties of Western culture is a shift in how humanity views itself and its relation to the natural world. By structuring my thesis in this way, I identify the roots of Western humanity's anthropocentric ontology first, explore the economic implications of automation second, analyze the cultural anticipations of artificial life in Western media third, and finally offer an alternative attitude and ethic as a way out of the pre-established judgments that do little to protect Western culture from E.A.I.
Title: E.A.I. Anxiety: Technopanic and Post-Human Potential.
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Name(s): Mandell, Zachary, Author
Brenckle, Martha, Committee Chair
Jones, Natasha, Committee Member
Scott, Blake, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Robots have been a part of the imagination of Western culture for centuries. The possibility for automation and artificial life has inspired the curiosity of thinkers like Leonardo Da Vinci who once designed a mechanical knight. It wasn't until the 19th century that automated machinery has become realized. The confrontation between human and automation has inspired a fear, referred to as (")technopanic("), that has been exacerbated in tandem with the evolution of technology. This thesis seeks to discover the historical precedence for these fears. I explore three modes of knowledge (Philosophy, Economics, and Film Theory) to examine the agendas behind the messages on the topic of Artificial Life, specifically Robots. I then advocate for an alternative philosophy called Post-Humanism. I argue that what is needed to alleviate the fears and anxieties of Western culture is a shift in how humanity views itself and its relation to the natural world. By structuring my thesis in this way, I identify the roots of Western humanity's anthropocentric ontology first, explore the economic implications of automation second, analyze the cultural anticipations of artificial life in Western media third, and finally offer an alternative attitude and ethic as a way out of the pre-established judgments that do little to protect Western culture from E.A.I.
Identifier: CFE0007049 (IID), ucf:52022 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, Writing and Rhetoric
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Post-Humanism -- Posthumanism -- Robots -- Artificial Intelligence -- A.I. -- Artificial Intelligence -- Ontology -- Epistemology -- Episteme -- Philology -- Philosophy of Language -- Economics -- Universal Basic Income -- Post-Scarcity -- Post Scarcity -- James Maynard Keynes -- Ghost in the Shell -- 2001: A Space Odyssey -- Kubrick -- Wall-E -- technology -- Culture Studies -- Automation -- Automated Labor -- Technopanic -- Film -- Film Theory -- Consciousness -- Anthropocentrism -- Culture Studies
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007049
Restrictions on Access: public 2018-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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