You are here

The Tragic City: Black Rebellion and the Struggle for Freedom in Miami, 1945-1990

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2018
Abstract/Description:
This thesis examines the creation of South Florida's tri-ethnic racial hierarchy during the postwar period, from 1945-1990. This racial hierarchy, coupled with discriminatory housing practices and police violence, created the necessary conditions for Dade County's first deadly uprising in 1968. Following the acquittal of several officers charged in the killing of an unarmed black businessman, a second uprising in 1980 culminated in three days and three nights of violent street warfare between law enforcement and black residents in Miami's northwest Liberty City neighborhood. The presence of state sanctioned violence at the hands of police in Liberty City set the stage for the city's second uprising. Further, the oftentimes murky and ambiguous racial divide that made people of color both comrades and rivals within Miami's larger power structure resulted in an Anglo-Cuban alliance by the late 1960s and early 1970s that only worsened racial tensions, especially among the city's ethnically diverse, English speaking black population. This thesis project uses a socio-historical framework to investigate how race and immigration, police brutality, and federal housing policy created a climate in which one of Miami's most vulnerable populations resorted to collective violence.
Title: The Tragic City: Black Rebellion and the Struggle for Freedom in Miami, 1945-1990.
47 views
24 downloads
Name(s): Dossie, Porsha, Author
Lester, Connie, Committee Chair
French, Scot, Committee Member
Walker, Ezekiel, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2018
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis examines the creation of South Florida's tri-ethnic racial hierarchy during the postwar period, from 1945-1990. This racial hierarchy, coupled with discriminatory housing practices and police violence, created the necessary conditions for Dade County's first deadly uprising in 1968. Following the acquittal of several officers charged in the killing of an unarmed black businessman, a second uprising in 1980 culminated in three days and three nights of violent street warfare between law enforcement and black residents in Miami's northwest Liberty City neighborhood. The presence of state sanctioned violence at the hands of police in Liberty City set the stage for the city's second uprising. Further, the oftentimes murky and ambiguous racial divide that made people of color both comrades and rivals within Miami's larger power structure resulted in an Anglo-Cuban alliance by the late 1960s and early 1970s that only worsened racial tensions, especially among the city's ethnically diverse, English speaking black population. This thesis project uses a socio-historical framework to investigate how race and immigration, police brutality, and federal housing policy created a climate in which one of Miami's most vulnerable populations resorted to collective violence.
Identifier: CFE0007173 (IID), ucf:52269 (fedora)
Note(s): 2018-08-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): race -- urban history -- McDuffie Riot -- Liberty City Riots -- Miami Beach -- Liberty City -- Overtown -- immigration -- Bahamians -- Cubans -- historiography -- Haitians -- Cuban Revolution -- Miami -- South Florida -- riots -- rioting -- urban uprisings -- civil rights movement -- black power -- black panther party -- Arthur McDuffie -- policing -- law enforcement -- violence -- urban renewal
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007173
Restrictions on Access: campus 2019-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections