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An Assessment of Biosorption Activated Media for the Removal of Pollutants in Up-Flow Stormwater Treatment Systems

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Date Issued:
2019
Abstract/Description:
Nitrogen and phosphorus are often the limiting nutrients for marine and freshwater systems respectively. Additionally, stormwater often contains elevated levels of pathogens which can pollute the receiving water body and impact reuse applications [1-4]. The reduction of limiting nutrients and pathogens is a common primary target for stormwater best management practices (BMPs) [5]. Traditional BMPs, such as retention/detention treatment ponds require large footprints and may not be practical in ultra-urban environments where above ground space is limited. Upflow filters utilizing biosorption activated media (BAM) that can be placed underground offer a small footprint alternative. Additionally, BAM upflow filters can be installed at the discharge point of traditional stormwater ponds to provide further treatment. This research simulated stormwater that had already been treated for solids removal; thus, most of the nutrients and solids in the influent were assumed to be as non-settable suspended solids or dissolved solids. Three different BAM mixtures in an upflow filter configuration were compared for the parameters of nitrogen, phosphorus, total coliform, E. coli, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Additionally, genetic testing was conducted using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), in conjunction with a nitrogen mass balance, to determine if Anammox was a significant player in the nitrogen removal. The columns were run at both 22-minute and 220-minute Empty Bed Contact Times (EBCTs). All the BAM mixtures analyzed were shown to be capable at the removal of nitrogen, phosphorus, and total coliform during both the 22-minute and 220-minute EBCTs, with BAM #1 having the highest removal performance for all three parameters during both EBCTs. All BAM mixtures experienced an increase in HPC. Additionally, PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Anammox in the biofilm and via mass balance it was determined that the biological nitrogen removal was due to Anammox and endogenous denitrification with Anammox being a significant mechanism.
Title: An Assessment of Biosorption Activated Media for the Removal of Pollutants in Up-Flow Stormwater Treatment Systems.
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Name(s): Hood, Andrew, Author
Randall, Andrew, Committee Chair
Wanielista, Martin, Committee Member
Chopra, Manoj, Committee Member
O'Reilly, Andrew, Committee Member
Moore, Sean, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2019
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Nitrogen and phosphorus are often the limiting nutrients for marine and freshwater systems respectively. Additionally, stormwater often contains elevated levels of pathogens which can pollute the receiving water body and impact reuse applications [1-4]. The reduction of limiting nutrients and pathogens is a common primary target for stormwater best management practices (BMPs) [5]. Traditional BMPs, such as retention/detention treatment ponds require large footprints and may not be practical in ultra-urban environments where above ground space is limited. Upflow filters utilizing biosorption activated media (BAM) that can be placed underground offer a small footprint alternative. Additionally, BAM upflow filters can be installed at the discharge point of traditional stormwater ponds to provide further treatment. This research simulated stormwater that had already been treated for solids removal; thus, most of the nutrients and solids in the influent were assumed to be as non-settable suspended solids or dissolved solids. Three different BAM mixtures in an upflow filter configuration were compared for the parameters of nitrogen, phosphorus, total coliform, E. coli, and heterotrophic plate count (HPC). Additionally, genetic testing was conducted using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), in conjunction with a nitrogen mass balance, to determine if Anammox was a significant player in the nitrogen removal. The columns were run at both 22-minute and 220-minute Empty Bed Contact Times (EBCTs). All the BAM mixtures analyzed were shown to be capable at the removal of nitrogen, phosphorus, and total coliform during both the 22-minute and 220-minute EBCTs, with BAM #1 having the highest removal performance for all three parameters during both EBCTs. All BAM mixtures experienced an increase in HPC. Additionally, PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Anammox in the biofilm and via mass balance it was determined that the biological nitrogen removal was due to Anammox and endogenous denitrification with Anammox being a significant mechanism.
Identifier: CFE0007817 (IID), ucf:52875 (fedora)
Note(s): 2019-12-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): BAM -- Biosorption Activated Media -- Biosorption -- Bold & Gold -- Bold and Gold -- Stormwater -- Storm water -- Highway Runoff -- Nitrogen -- Phosphorus -- total phosphorus -- TP -- ortho-phosphorus -- orthophosphorus -- SRP -- Soluble Reactive Phosphorus -- ammonia -- ammonium -- nitrate -- nitrite -- total nitrogen -- TN -- Anammox -- DNRA -- Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium -- Nitrification -- Denitrification -- Total Coliform -- E. coli -- HPC -- PCR -- dissolved nutrients -- nutrient removal -- pollutants -- pathogens -- Upflow filter -- eutrophication -- Ammonification -- tire chip -- activated carbon -- tire crumb -- clay -- expanded clay -- LECA -- sand filter -- sorption -- adsorption -- absorption -- ion exchange -- filtration -- filter -- sedimentation -- flocculation -- endogenous respiration -- endogenous denitrification -- endogenous -- chemoautotrophic denitrification -- heterotrophic -- urban runoff -- runoff -- ultra-urban -- ultra-urban runoff -- Best Management Practice -- BMP -- drainage -- water resources -- discharge -- surface water -- TMDL -- nitrogen cycle -- nitrogen removal -- phosphorus removal -- TSS -- solids -- biofilm -- biomass -- micro-anoxic zone -- anoxic -- anaerobic -- aerobic -- EBCT -- empty bed contact time -- hydraulic loading rate -- bacteria -- organic carbon -- TOC
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0007817
Restrictions on Access: public 2019-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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