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Analysis of parental choice : Islamic school enrollment in Florida

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Date Issued:
1996
Abstract/Description:
University of Central Florida College of Education Thesis; The purpose of this study was to discover and interpret reasons Florida parents enrolled their children in Islamic schools. A selection of 30 parents from 3 different schools in Florida were interviewed by the researcher using a semistructured interview guide which used both oral and written responses. The sample was matched according to the gender of parents interviewed - 15 mothers and 15 fathers were interviewed. the sample was matched according to the gender of the referent child. Out of 30 referent children, 15 were female and 15 were male. The researcher included children of all grade levels. Fifteen were from primary grades (1-5) and 15 were from secondary grades (6-12). The researcher served as the primary instrument for data collection. Data were summarized and reported in a descriptive format addressing each research question. Results indicated that the first reason for choosing Islamic schools was religious; the second reason was sociocultural and the last reason was academic. Many parents who enrolled their children in Islamic schools strongly envisioned the need to create schools where children could pursue the Islamic knowledge, preserve Islamic identity and develop the Islamic personality. Parents wanted the guard and shield their progeny from the negative influence (violence, drugs, promiscuity, prejudice, etc.) of the public schools. The academic concern was not a major reason for the majority of responding parents. A significant finding affirmed that Islamic education does not separate between religious and social factors. Findings indicated that parents were more attracted to Islamic schools than dissatisfied with public schools. Muslim parents were concerned with retaining their children's identity and religious commitment. At the same time, they wanted them to learn in a safe environment which galvanized them against negative effects of the dominant culture, and be able to survive the tide of assimilation, secular pressure and moral deterioration.
Title: Analysis of parental choice : Islamic school enrollment in Florida.
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Name(s): Elkhaldy, Feryal Y., Author
Kysilka, Marcella, Committee Chair
Education, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 1996
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: University of Central Florida College of Education Thesis; The purpose of this study was to discover and interpret reasons Florida parents enrolled their children in Islamic schools. A selection of 30 parents from 3 different schools in Florida were interviewed by the researcher using a semistructured interview guide which used both oral and written responses. The sample was matched according to the gender of parents interviewed - 15 mothers and 15 fathers were interviewed. the sample was matched according to the gender of the referent child. Out of 30 referent children, 15 were female and 15 were male. The researcher included children of all grade levels. Fifteen were from primary grades (1-5) and 15 were from secondary grades (6-12). The researcher served as the primary instrument for data collection. Data were summarized and reported in a descriptive format addressing each research question. Results indicated that the first reason for choosing Islamic schools was religious; the second reason was sociocultural and the last reason was academic. Many parents who enrolled their children in Islamic schools strongly envisioned the need to create schools where children could pursue the Islamic knowledge, preserve Islamic identity and develop the Islamic personality. Parents wanted the guard and shield their progeny from the negative influence (violence, drugs, promiscuity, prejudice, etc.) of the public schools. The academic concern was not a major reason for the majority of responding parents. A significant finding affirmed that Islamic education does not separate between religious and social factors. Findings indicated that parents were more attracted to Islamic schools than dissatisfied with public schools. Muslim parents were concerned with retaining their children's identity and religious commitment. At the same time, they wanted them to learn in a safe environment which galvanized them against negative effects of the dominant culture, and be able to survive the tide of assimilation, secular pressure and moral deterioration.
Identifier: CFR0008180 (IID), ucf:53056 (fedora)
Note(s): 1996-08-01
Ed.D.
Educational Foundations
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Electronically reproduced by the University of Central Florida from a book held in the John C. Hitt Library at the University of Central Florida, Orlando.
Subject(s): Dissertations
Academic -- Education
Education -- Dissertations
Academic
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFR0008180
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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